At a Glance:

Advisors:
Gordon: Nathan Patterson

Nathan Patterson, Fire Science Instructor
Office: 339
Phone: 706-378-1731
Email:
Campus: Gordon County Campus
Department: Public Service Technology

Firefighter/EMSP (FI12)

Offered at the Following Campus

  • Gordon County Campus

Program Overview

The Firefighter/Emergency Medical Services Professional diploma program is designed to prepare students for entry level employment in the public safety areas of fire service and emergency medical services. Upon completion of the Firefighter/Emergency Medical Services Professional diploma, students may be eligible for certification and/or licensure in the following areas: Firefighter I, Firefighter II EMT and AEMT.

Gainful Employment Information

Entrance Requirements

 

* Must be 18 years of age.
* Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of   official transcript required to apply.
* Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math.
*Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar.
* Must be NPQ-I certified or certified at the Fire Fighter I level.
* Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate.
*Conviction of a felony or gross misdemeanor may prohibit employment in field and may make a student ineligible to take licensing/certification exam(s) required for the profession. A background check and/or drug screen may be required by some agencies before a student attends a clinical practicum. For more information, contact the appropriate program advisor.

Course Overview

Credit Hours
Basic Skills Courses (6 hours)
Emphasizes the development and improvement of written and oral communication abilities. Topics include analysis of writing, applied grammar and writing skills, editing and proofreading skills, research skills, and oral communication skills.
Emphasizes the application of basic mathematical skills used in the solution of occupational and technical problems. Topics include fractions, decimals, percents, ratios and proportions, measurement and conversion, formula manipulation, technical applications, and basic statistics.
Occupational Curriculum (57 hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
This course provides the student with information on the applicable laws, policies, and standards that the Firefighter I course is designed, and how the course will be administered. This course will provide the student basic knowledge of where and how the fire service originated from the colonial periods to present day firefighting operations. The student will learn basic roles and responsibilities of a firefighter, how firefighters have to abide by and work from standard operating procedures and guidelines, and how the chain of command works and their position within it. The student will be provided the knowledge on how to communicate within the fire service; whether it with the fire station or on the fire ground. This course provides the emergency responder with basic principles and functions of the Incident Command System. The course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills to operate within the ICS and their role within the ICS at the fire station, at a non-emergency scene, and at emergency scenes. It will provide also provide the emergency responder with knowledge on how to perform basic skills at emergency scenes that deal with infection control, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, basic first aid measures, and using an AED. Finally, it will provide the emergency responder skills and knowledge on how to recognize the presence of and the potential for a hazardous materials release, and how and who personnel should call. Upon completion of this course the student emergency responder candidate/recruit will have the basic skills and knowledge to be able to obtain a certificate of completion or become certified through the appropriate governing agency for the following: 1. Infection Control 2. CPR 3. First Aid 4. ICS-100 5. IS-700 6. NPQ - Hazardous Materials for First Responders Awareness Level This course meets the requirements NFPA 1001 Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications and all other state, local, and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements.
This course provides the firefighter candidate/recruit with basic knowledge and skills to perform various fire ground operations as a firefighter on emergency scenes. The candidate/recruit will learn about safety during all phases of a firefighters career, the personal protective equipment that is required for training and every emergency response, and how to properly don it for use and doff it after use. The candidate/recruit will learn about the dynamics of fire through fire behavior and how to extinguish the different phases of fires with either portable fire extinguishers or through fire suppression attacks and techniques. The candidate/recruit will also learn the three tactical priorities of Life Safety, Incident Stabilization, and Property Conservation that have to be achieved on every fireground. Basic knowledge and skills will be provided to the candidate/recruit so they can achieve the tactical priorities through various fireground operations such as: response + size-up, forcible entry, ladders, search + rescue, ventilation, water supply, fire hose, fire nozzles, fire streams, salvage, and overhaul. Upon completion of this course the student emergency responder candidate/recruit will have the basic skills and knowledge to be able to obtain a certificate of completion or become certified through the appropriate governing agency for the following: 1. Module I This course meets the requirements NFPA 1001 Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications and all other state, local, and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements.
This course builds from the skills and knowledge in Module I and provides the knowledge and skills to support the fireground techniques learned in the previous courses. The firefighter will learn various uses of ropes + knots and how to hoist fire fighting tools and equipment. The firefighter will also gain the knowledge and skills of building construction principles that will be used throughout their firefighting career to identify building conditions such as: fire spread and travel, how and where to ventilate, indications of potential building collapse, etc. The firefighter will learn survival techniques that will be used throughout their career to help keep themselves safe and how to rescue themselves or another firefighter. Firefighter rehabilitation will be discussed during this course, so that the firefighter will know how and when to properly rehab themselves before, during, after an emergency response. Knowledge of fire suppression systems will be discussed, so that the firefighter will have a basic understanding of the components of a fire detection, protection, and suppression system. Basic cause determination will be discussed so that firefighters will be aware of observations during various phases of fireground operations. Finally to complete the Firefighter I program the firefighter will participate in the following live fire scenarios in order to complete the objectives of the program. 1. Exterior Class A Fire 2. Interior Structure Attack Above Grade Level 3. Interior Structure Attack Below Grade Level 4. Vehicle Fire 5. Dumpster Fire Upon completion of this course the student emergency responder candidate/recruit will have the basic skills and knowledge to be able to obtain a certificate of completion or become certified through the appropriate governing agency for the following: 1. NPQ Fire Fighter I This course meets the requirements NFPA 1001 Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications and all other state, local, and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements.
This course provides emergency responder personnel with the information to respond safely, limit possible exposure to all personnel, and to provide information to the proper authorities as being a primary goal while reacting in the defensive mode of operation. The first responder operations level responsibilities are recognition and identification of a hazardous material scene, the gathering of information, the notification of the proper authorities, the isolation of the area by setting perimeters/zones, possible evacuation, protection by initiating the incident management system, emergency decontamination, and performing defensive actions only. Even though the first responder is a member of an emergency response service, they are not trained in specialized protective clothing or specialized control equipment. Thus, the first responder is not a member of a hazardous materials response team. This course meets the requirements of NFPA 472 - Professional Competence of First Responders to Haz Mat Incidents at the Operations Level. This course also meets the requirements of OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120, EPA, USDOT, and all other appropriate state, local and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements. Also required as prerequisite: NPQ FF I and NPQ Hazardous Materials Awareness Level
Most structural fires, fire deaths and fire injuries occur in the home. This course addresses some of the most important responsibilities of the modern fire service; teaching the public to prevent or if needed, escape fires and related emergencies. We have adopted the approach that we must learn from each incident then put the information to work to prevent fires and fire losses through public fire and life safety education. Topics include: general requisite knowledge, administration, planning and development, education and implementation, and evaluation.
This course provides the student with the necessary skills of fire prevention, emergency scene preparedness, and tool and equipment maintenance. Specifically addressed are the following topics: basic principles of building construction; knowledge of water supply systems to include pressurized systems, rural water supplies, and alternative water supplies; perform hydrant flow tests as part of water flow assessments for water supplies coming from pressurized hydrants; discuss fire detection, suppression, and suppression systems; consolidate all knowledge to perform a pre-incident plan of a facility; selection of proper tools and techniques of cleaning and proper maintenance of those tools; discuss hoselines, nozzles, and fire streams to perform hoseline lays with proper nozzles attached and select the proper fire stream for the class of fire encountered on various types of fire scenes; and service testing of fire hoses. Finally, this course will conclude fire cause determination to gain necessary knowledge and skills to perform a fire investigation to determine the point of origin and the cause of a fire in a structure. To participate in this course the student must also attain national certification of Firefighter I status or successful completion of FRSC 1020, FRSC 1030, FRSC 1040 and FRSC 1141.
This course provides an awareness of the principles of technical rescue through utilization of readings from the text, classroom discussion, practical skills, and practice. This course includes Extricating a victim entrapped in a Motor Vehicle, Assisting a Rescue Team in various technical rescue operations including but not limited to Trench and Excavation, Rope Rescue, Water Rescue, Confined Space Operations, Structural Collapse, Vehicle and Machinery Rescue, and Wilderness Search and Rescue. The student will learn the application of knots, rigging principles, anchor selection criteria, system safety check procedures, rope construction and rope rescue equipment applications and limitations. This course fulfills NFPA 1001, Standard for Firefighter Professional Qualifications, 2008 Edition Chapter 6 sections 6.4.1, 6.4.2 and NFPA 1006, Standard for Technical Rescuer Professional Qualifications, 2008 Edition Chapter 5 sections 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5.1, 5.5.2, 5.5.3, 5.5.4, 5.5.5, 5.5.8, 5.5.9, 5.5.11, 5.5.14 and NFPA 1670, Standard on operations and Training for Technical Search and Rescue Incidents, 2004 Edition sections 5.2.2, 6.2.2, 6.3.47.2.48.2.3, 9.2.3, 10.2.2, 11.2.3. To participate in this course, the student must also have attained national certification of Firefighter I status or successful completion of FRSC 1020, FRSC 1030, FRSC 1040 and FRSC 1141.
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This course will provide the student basic knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of the Firefighter II; the standard operating procedures and guidelines of firefighters; fire service communications relative to obtaining information from occupants and owners to complete an incident report can be completed accurately; Incident Command principles and their application; practical fireground hydraulics to supply proper nozzle pressures while participating in live fire scenarios. To participate in this course the student must also attain National certification of Firefighter I status or successful completion of FRSC 1020, FRSC 1030, FRSC 1040, FRSC 1141.
This course serves as the introductory course to the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) profession. It orients the student to the prehospital care envrionment, issues reltated to the provision of the patient care in both in-hospital and out-of-hospital curcumstances. It further provides foundational information upon which subsequent curriculum content is based so that successful completion of this content increases the potential for success in subsequent courses and should allow students to apply the fundamental knowledge, skills, and attitudes gained in order to effectively communicate and function safely, ethically and professionally within the emergency medical services environment.
Pre-requisite:  Program admission.  This course prepares students for initial scene management and assessment of patients as well as management of the airway. Introduction to pharmacology is also covered. Includes application of scene information and patient assessment findings (scene size up, primary and secondary assessment, patient history, and reassessment) to guide emergency management. Topics include: Scene Size-Up; Primary Assessment; History Taking; Secondary Assessment; Monitoring Devices; Reassessment; Airway Management; Respiration; Artificial entilation; Principles of Pharmacology; Medication Administration; and Emergency Medications.

Pre-requisite:  Program admission.  This course integrates pathophysiological principles and assessment findings to formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan of cases involving non-traumatic medical emergencies. Topics include: Medical Overview; Neurology; Abdominal and Gastrointestinal Disorders; Immunology; Infectious Disease; Endocrine Disorders; Psychiatric; Cardiovascular; Toxicology; Respiratory; Hematology; Genitourinary/Renal; Non-Traumatic Musculoskeletal Disorders; Diseases of the Eyes, Ears, Nose, and Throat; and Medical Assessments.

 

This course provides supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings as well as opportunities to demonstrate critical thinking skills and assessment based management techniques through competency based evaluations relevant to the practice of an EMT. Topics include: Clinicals and Assessment Based Management.
This course provides supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings. Topics include: Clinicals.