At a Glance:

Advisor:
Walker: Deborah Carson

Deborah Carson, Secretary
Office: 6200
Phone: 706-764-3851
Email:
Campus: Walker County Campus
Department: Nursing and Allied Health Technologies , Health Technologies

(She will assign you an advisor on the WCC.)


Website:
Associate Degree Nursing (ADN)

Nursing LPN to ASN Transition (NLT3)

Offered at the Following Campus

  • Walker County Campus

Program Overview

The Associate Degree Nursing program at Georgia Northwestern Technical College prepares the learner to apply the behaviors, knowledge, and skills required of a self-directed, critical thinking, beginning nurse generalist. Upon successful completion of the program, the graduate will be able to function as a provider of care, manager of care, and member of the discipline of nursing. The program has received approval from the Georgia Board of Nursing and accreditation by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing.

Nursing LPN to ASN Transition Guidelines:
Transition Students
The Associate of Science in Nursing degree program has an accelerated track for LPNs who desire to transition to ASN. The LPN to ASN Transition track of the ASN program provides qualified licensed practical nurses the opportunity to advance their formal nursing education to achieve an Associate of Science in Nursing degree and qualify to take the National Council Licensing Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).
The program builds on the previous education and experience of the LPN providing an accelerated track for completion of the degree requirements.

Entrance Date: Beginning of any semester for pre-occupational curriculum, summer semester of odd-numbered years for occupational curriculum.

Entrance Requirements

Note: The Associate Degree Nursing Program requires that all pre-occupational courses are completed prior to selection into the transition track. There are other program specific requirements. Please contact the Associate Degree Nursing Program for additional information.

Course Overview

Credit Hours
Pre-Occupational Curriculum (30 hours)
Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2113. the laboratory exercises for this course include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classificatins, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous snesory systems.
Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system,and reproductive system.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2114. The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immunie system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reporductive system.
Provides students with a foundation in basic microbiology with emphasis on infectious disease. Topics include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, microorganisms and human disease.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2117. The laboratory exercises for this course include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, and microorganisms and human disease.
Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.
PSYC
2103
3
Emphasizes changes that occur during the human life cycle beginning with conception and continuing through late adulthood and death and emphasizes the scientific basis of our knowledge of human growth and development and the interactive forces of nature and nurture. Topics include but are not limited to theoretical perspectives and research methods, prenatal development and child birth, stages of development from infancy through late adulthood, and death and dying.
MATH
1111
3
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
SPCH
1101
3
Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism.
and one of the following (3 hours)
3
Emphasizes American literature as a reflection of culture and ideas. A survey of important works in American literature. Includes a variety of literary genres: short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and novels. Topics include literature and culture, essential themes and ideas, literature and history, and research skills.
Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research.
MUSC
1101
3
Explores the analysis of well-known works of music, their compositions, and the relationship to their periods. An introduction to locating, acquiring, and documenting information resources lays the foundation for research to include the creative and critical process, the themes of music, the formal elements of composition, and the placing of music in the historical context. Topics include historical and cultural development represented in musical arts.
Nursing Curriculum (3 semesters) (32 hours)
This course introduces the student to basic principles of pharmacology and the basic mathematical concepts utilized in calculating medication dosages for safe administration to patients throughout the lifespan. Areas of emphasis include concepts of legal implications, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, calculation of drug dosages, and medication preparation. The student is also introduced to the role of the nurse in assessment, planning, intervention and evaluation of the care of the patient receiving pharmacologic therapy. This course is webenhanced. Students may be required to access information, submit assignments, and test online through Angel.
9
The LPN to ADN Transition course (RNSG 2010) is offered in the su term prior to entering the second level of the nursing program. This course is designed to initiate the transition process from the LPN to RN and builds upon previously learned basic knowledge and skills. The focus of RNSG 2010 is upon the nursing of individuals throughout the lifespan experiencing common predictible alterations in function. Content presented includes: the transition process; the nursing process; nursing care of the patient with oncology and pain, nursing care of the perioperative patient, alterations in respiratory function, alterations hepatic and biliary function, alterations in mental health.

Lifespan Nursing Care II is offered in the third semester of the nursing program. It is the second course of a three course sequence focusing on the nursing needs of individuals throughout the lifespan experiencing common, predictable alterations in function. Content presented includes nursing care of the patient with alterations in: sensorineural function; hematological function; peripheral vascular function; cardiac function; urinary/renal function; and, glucose metabolism. The conceptual threads of nutrition, pharmacology, growth and development, communication, cultural diversity, teaching/learning process, nursing process/critical thinking, legal/ethical factors, technological competence, safety, disaster/emergency management the health-illness continuum, and therapeutic interventions continue to be incorporated throughout the course. The lecture and laboratory component of this course introduces the student to the application of the nursing process to patients with selected alterations in function which are considered more complex. Emphasis is placed on identification of both physiological and psychosocial problems with appropriate interventions. Continued emphasis is placed on goal setting and the evaluation of goal achievement. In the clinical setting the student will apply learned knowledge and psychomotor/psychosocial skills in providing nursing care for one or more assigned culturally diverse patients of all ages in diverse care settings including acute, ambulatory, and community experiences. This is a web enhanced course. Students may be required to access information, submit assignments, and test online through ANGEL.

Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family is offered in the fall semester of the second year of the nursing program. This course focuses on the nursing needs of culturally diverse individuals experiencing pregnancy, childbirth, and the post partum period as well as women’s health alterations. Growth and development from conception through the fetal period is presented. Nursing needs of the infant up to 1 year is also emphasized. Assessment of the maternity patient and the newborn are introduced. Social, legal, and ethical issues related to reproduction are explored. The curriculum threads of nutrition, pharmacology, growth and development, communication, cultural diversity, teaching/learning process, nursing process/critical thinking, legal/ethical factors, technological competence, safety, the health illness continuum, therapeutic interventions, and disaster/emergency management continue to be incorporated throughout the course. The roles of the associate degree nurse as a provider of care, a manager of care, and a member of the discipline of nursing are discussed. The nurse’s role in the promotion and restoration of optimal health is included. The lecture and laboratory component of this course introduces the student to the application of the nursing process to patients during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period and to patients with selected womens health alterations. Emphasis on identification of physiological and psychosocial problems, goal setting, selection of appropriate therapeutic interventions and rationale, and evaluation of goal achievement is continued in this course. Prioritization of nursing diagnoses is introduced. In the clinical setting, the student will apply learned knowledge and psychomotor/psychosocial skills in providing nursing care for one or more assigned culturally diverse patients and their families in diverse acute care settings. The student will gain experience in the performance of nursing skills utilized in the care of female and newborn patients. The student continues to gain experience in collaborating with members of the health care team. This is a web enhanced course. Students may be required to access information, submit assignments, or test online through ANGEL.

Lifespan Nursing Care III is the third and last course in the lifespan nursing course sequence and is offered in the last semester of the nursing program. This course focuses on the nursing needs of culturally diverse individuals throughout the lifespan who are experiencing more complex but predictable alterations in function. It is a capstone course providing comprehensive application of acquired nursing knowledge. Content presented includes nursing care of the patient with alterations in integumentary function, endocrine function, immunological function, and neurological function. Additional content covered includes critical care, disaster, and emergency nursing topics. The curriculum threads of nutrition, pharmacology, growth and development, communication, cultural diversity, teaching/learning process, nursing process/critical thinking, legal/ethical factors, technological competence, safety, the health illness continuum, therapeutic interventions, and disaster/emergency management continue to be incorporated throughout the course. The roles of the associate degree nurse as a provider of care, a manager of care, and a member of the discipline of nursing are discussed. The nurses role in the promotion and restoration of optimal health is included. The lecture and laboratory component of this course introduces the student to the application of the nursing process to patients with selected alterations in function which are considered most complex. Management of patients in emergency and disaster situations is introduced. Emphasis on identification of physiological and psychosocial problems, goal setting, selection of appropriate therapeutic interventions and rationale, evaluation of goal achievement, and prioritization of care is continued in this course. In the clinical setting, the student will apply learned knowledge and psychomotor/psychosocial skills in providing nursing care for multiple culturally diverse patients and their families in diverse acute care settings under the supervision of a preceptor. The preceptor will serve as a mentor to facilitate the student’s transition from school to the practice setting. The student will gain experience in the performance of nursing skills utilized in the care of patients with more complex alterations in function and in the care of critically ill patients. The student continues to gain experience in collaborating with members of the health care team and with patients family and/or significant other. This is a web-enhanced course. The student may be required to access information, submit assignments and test online. This is a web enhanced course. Students may be required to access information, submit assignments, and test online through ANGEL.

Course Description This is a non-clinical course designed to facilitate the role transition from nursing student to novice registered nurse generalist. Focus is placed on principles of management, leadership, delegation, and professional development. Employment principles and practice and the responsibility of the nurse to the community and the nursing profession are included. Trends and issues related to legal, ethical, economic, and political influences on the health care delivery system are discussed. The curricular threads of communication, nursing process/critical thinking, legal/ethical factors, and technological competence are incorporated throughout the course. The course concludes with readiness testing in preparation for the NCLEX-RN. This is a web-enhanced course. Students may be required to access information, submit assignments, and test online through ANGEL.