At a Glance:

Advisor:
Walker: Carissa Dapp
Carissa Dapp, Program Director & Instructor of Pharmacy Technology
Office: 6110
Phone: 706-764-3850
Email:
Campus: Walker County Campus
Department: Nursing and Allied Health Technologies , Pharmacy

Credentials

A.S., Northwestern Technical College

Pharmacy Technology (PT23)

Offered at the Following Campus

  • Walker County Campus

Program Overview

The Pharmacy Technology degree is designed to provide an individual with the entry level skills required for success in a retail pharmacy or a hospital-based pharmacy de­partment. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and replacement. Graduates are prepared to function as pharmacy technicians in positions requiring preparations of medications according to prescription under the supervision of a pharmacist.

Entrance Dates: Fall and Spring Semesters

Entrance Requirements

Age: 17 years old for entrance into Health Technology pre-occupational curriculum
         18 years old for entrance into Health Technology programs  

Admission requirements for occupational curriculum: 1) Attainment of 18 or more years of age; 2) Documentation of high school graduation or completion of GED®; 3) achievement of program ready or provisional scores on the placement test; and 4) completion of general admission.

Special note: This program does not participate in competitive admissions and all courses can be taken as directed by program faculty.

Course Overview

Credit Hours
General Core Curriculum (23 hours)
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2113. the laboratory exercises for this course include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classificatins, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous snesory systems.
Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system,and reproductive system.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2114. The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immunie system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reporductive system.
XXX
xxx
Hum/Fine Arts Elective
3
XXX
xxx
Social/Behavior Sciences Elective
3
XXX
xxx
General Education Elective
3
and one of the following (3 hours)
Emphasizes algebra, statistics, and mathematics of finance. Topics include fundamental operations of algebra, sets and logic, probability and statistics, geometry, mathematics of voting and districting, and mathematics of finance.
3
Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.
MATH
1111
3
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.
Occupational Curriculum (42 hours)
Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Topics include: basic life support/CPR, basic emergency care/first aid and triage, vital signs, infection control/blood and air-borne pathogens.
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
This course develops knowledge and skills in pharmaceutical calculations procedures. Topics include: systems of measurement, medication dispensing calculations, pharmacy mathematical procedures, and calculation tools and techniques.
Provides an overview of the pharmacy technology field and develops the fundamental concepts and principles necessary for successful participation in the pharmacy field. Topics include: safety, orientation to the pharmacy technology field, Fundamental principles of chemistry, basic laws of chemistry, ethics and laws, definitions and terms, and reference sources.
This course introduces the student to principles of receiving, storing, and dispensing medications. Topics include: purchasing, packaging, and labeling drugs; pharmacy policies and procedures; documentation; inventory and filing systems; compounding; storage and control; pharmacy equipment; and health care organizational structure. This course provides laboratory and clinical practice.
Continues the development of student knowledge and skills in preparing medication, processing glassware, and maintaining an aseptic environment. Topics include: aseptic and sterile techniques, parenteral admixtures, hyperalimentation, chemotherapy, filtering, disinfecting, contamination, ophthalmic preparations, infection control, and quality control.
PHAR
1040
4
The course introduces the students to principles and knowledge about all classifications of medication. Topics include: disease states and treatment modalities, pharmaceutical side effects and drug interactions, control substances, specific drugs, and drug addiction and abuse.
Orients students to the clinical environment and provides experiences with the basic skills necessary for the pharmacy technician. Topics include: storage and control, documentation, inventory and billing, community practice, institutional practice, and communication,
Pre-requisites:  COMP 1000; PHAR 1030; PHAR 1050.  This course presents the advanced concepts and principles needed in the pharmacy technology field. Topics include: physician orders, patient profiles, pharmacy data systems, job readiness, legal requirements, inventory and billing, pharmaceutical calculations review and pharmacology review.
Pre-requisites:  COMP 1000; PHAR 1030; PHAR 1050.  Continues the development of student knowledge and skills applicable to pharmacy technology practice. Topics include: dispensing responsibilities, physician orders, controlled substances, hyperalimentation, chemotherapy, patient profiles, pharmacy data systems, ophthalmic preparations, and hospital/retail/home health pharmacy techniques.
And One of the Following: (2 hours)
Introduces the elements of medical terminology. Emphasis is placed on building familiarity with medical words through knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Topics include: origins (roots, prefixes, and suffixes), word building, abbreviations and symbols, and terminology related to the human anatomy.
2
Introduces the basic spelling and pronunciation of medical terms, and the use of these terms as they relate to anatomy, treatment, surgery, and drugs. Topics include: word analysis, word elements, spelling, pronunciation, and semantics.