At a Glance:

Advisor:

Floyd: Zenia Bratton

Zenia Bratton, Program Director & Instructor of Respiratory Care
Office: H221
Phone: 706-295-6910
Email:
Campus: Floyd County Campus
Department: Health Technologies, Respiratory Care

Credentials

B.B.A., East Tennessee State University; A.A.S., East Tennessee State University; M.S., Troy University

OR

Floyd: Ted Porter

Ted Porter, Instructor of Respiratory Care
Office: H222
Phone: 706-802-5030
Email:
Campus: Floyd County Campus
Department: Health Technologies, Respiratory Care

Credentials

B.S., University of Central Florida

VIDEO: The Respiratory Care Technology Program

Respiratory Care (RCT3)

Offered at the Following Campus

  • Floyd County Campus

Program Overview

The Respiratory Care Associate Degree is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the field of respiratory care. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes specialized training in areas such as pulmonary and cardiac pharmacology, medical gases, humidity/aerosol therapy, positive pressure ventilation, incentive spirometry, patient assessment, postural drainage, percussion/vibration, assessment of diseases and conditions, critical respiratory care, advanced critical care monitoring, pulmonary function testing, and pediatric and neonatal respiratory care. Program graduates receive a respiratory care associate degree which qualifies them to take the examinations to become a Registered Respiratory Therapist. Students may become certified by taking the Entry Level Certification Examination administered by the National Board for Respiratory Care. Upon successful completion of the Certification (CRT) Exam, the graduate is eligible to take both parts of the Registry (RRT) Exams. To work in the state of Georgia, all respiratory care practitioners must apply and be granted a license. The only way to obtain a license is to pass at least the Entry Level Certification Exam.

Entrance Dates: Beginning of any semester for pre-occupational curriculum.
                          Spring semester for occupational curriculum.

Entrance Requirements

Age: 17 years old for entrance into Health Technology pre-occupational curriculum
         18 years old for entrance into Health Technology programs

The Respiratory Care Technology program at Georgia Northwestern Technical College is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC) (www.coarc.com). Progammatic Outcomes Data can be found at www.coarc.com/47.html.

Course Overview

Credit Hours
Pre-Occupational Curriculum (24 - 32 hours)
Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2113. the laboratory exercises for this course include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classificatins, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous snesory systems.
Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system,and reproductive system.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2114. The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immunie system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reporductive system.
Provides students with a foundation in basic microbiology with emphasis on infectious disease. Topics include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, microorganisms and human disease.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2117. The laboratory exercises for this course include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, and microorganisms and human disease.
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
XXX
xxx
Humanities/Fine Arts Elective
3
XXX
xxx
Social/Behavior Sciences Elective
3
and one of the following (0 - 4 hours)
Provides an introduction to basic chemical principles and concepts which explain the behavior of matter. Topics include measurement and units, atomic structure, chemical bonding, physical states of matter, nomenclature, stoichiometry, acids and bases, gases, liquid mixtures, nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry.
Note: ALHS 1127 Will No Longer Be An Option Effective With Spring 2014 Cohort (0 hours)
or (3 hours)
CHEM
1211
3
Provides an introduction to basic chemical principles and concepts which explain the behavior of matter. Topics include measurement, physical and chemical properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical reactions, and stoichiometry and gas laws.
plus (1 hour)
CHEM
1211L
1
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in CHEM 1211. The laboratory exercise for this course include measurement, physical and chemical properties of matter, automic structure, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry and gas laws.
and one of the following (0 - 4 hours)
Introduces the student to the basic laws of physics with specific applications for health science students. Topics include basic Newtonian mechanics, fluid mechanics, heat and temperature, medical imaging techniques that utilize electromagnetic radiation and sound, basic principles of waves, light, and sound, basic principles of electricity and magnetism, and electrical safety.
Note: ALHS 1126 Will No Longer Be An Option Effective With Spring 2014 Cohort (0 hours)
or (3 hours)
PHYS
1110
3
Introduces some of the basic laws of physics. Topics include systems of units and conversion of units, vector algebra, Newtonian mechanics, fluids and thermodynamics, heat, light, and optics, mechanical waves, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics.
plus (1 hour)
1
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in PHYS 1110. The laboratory exercises for this course include systems of units and systems of measurement, vector algebra, Newtonian mechanics, fluids and thermodynamics, heat, light, and optics, mechanical waves, electiricty and magnetism, and modern physics.
and one of the following (3 hours)
3
Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.
MATH
1111
3
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.
Occupational Curriculum (57 hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
RESP
1110
3
Introduces the physiologic and pharmacological basis of pulmonary and cardiac medications. Focuses on the preparation and calculation of dosages and mixtures and general principles of pharmacology as they relate to the body systems. Topics include: drug preparation, dosage calculation, mixture preparation, pharmacology principles, delivery systems, respiratory drugs, and cardiopulmonary system related drugs.
Provides students with an introduction and comprehensive survey of the respiratory care profession. Emphasizes the application of physics and chemistry as the foundation for specific modes of respiratory care principles employed in patient care, including indications, hazards, contraindications, evaluation of therapy, and patient assessment. Topics include: respiratory therapy chemistry and physics principles, patient assessment, medical gas therapy, , humidity and aerosol therapy, hyperinflation therapy, bronchopulmonary hygiene, infection control practices, and hospital safety.
Provides students with the opportunity to gain hands-on experience with basic respiratory therapy equipment and simulated practice of basic respiratory care modalities. Topics include: patient assessment, medical gas therapy, humidity and aerosol therapy, hyperinflation therapy, airway clearance techniques, infection control procedures, and medical ethics.
7
Provides an in-depth study of cardiac and pulmonary anatomy and physiology, and the diagnostic procedures commonly used in the hospital to evaluate these systems. Emphasizes the heart-lung relationship and clinical applications of these phenomena in the cardiopulmonary system. Topics include: respiratory function; ventilatory mechanisms; gas transport; laboratory analysis; natural and chemical regulation of breathing; circulation, blood flow and pressure, and cardiac function; renal physiology and related topics.
2
Introduces students to clinical practice in basic respiratory care procedures. Topics include: introduction to clinical affiliate, medical gas therapy, oxygen therapy, aerosol therapy, incentive spirometry, inspiratory and expiratory PIP/PEP devices, patient assessment, and basic life support (BLS).
2
Continues to develop skills used in the clinical practice. Topics include: medical gas therapy, oxygen therapy, aerosol therapy, incentive spirometry, and patient assessment.
RESP
2110
3
Provides students with information concerning assessment of etiology, pathophysiology, treatment, and prognosis of common cardiopulmonary, cardiovascular, and pulmonary diseases and conditions. Topics include: infectious diseases and conditions, respiratory diseases and conditions, neuromuscular diseases and conditions, cardiovascular diseases and conditions, sleep apnea, patient assessment, laboratory tests, chest radiographs, and trauma.
Provides students with knowledge on all phases of adult critical care and continuous mechanical ventilation. Topics include: mechanical ventilation history, principles of mechanical ventilation, continuous mechanical ventilation, ventilator implementation, ventilation monitoring, ventilator weaning, ventilator discontinuance and special techniques.
Provides instruction in the theory, set-up, operation, and maintenance of mechanical ventilators and equipment used to establish and maintain both adult and pediatric airways and emergency airway disorders. Topics include: ventilator operation, ventilator maintenance, emergency airway disorders, adult airway establishment and maintenance, pediatric airway establishment and maintenance, fiberoptic bronchoscopy, thoracentesis, chest tube maintenance, arterial blood gas sampling, and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation.
Provides a study of advanced critical care techniques for hemodynamic and non invasive monitoring. Topics include: arterial pressure monitoring, central venous catheters, pulmonary artery catheters, cardiac output measurement, and non invasive monitoring techniques.
Provides knowledge regarding normal and abnormal pulmonary functions. Emphasizes performance, interpretation, and evaluation of various pulmonary function studies. Topics include: pulmonary function testing, pulmonary function interpretation, pulmonary function evaluation, blood gas analysis, and polysomnography
Provides concepts on the processes of growth and development related to respiratory care from the fetus to the adolescent. Relates physiologic function to respiratory care assessment. Topics include: fetal growth and development, neonatal growth and development, fetal assessment, neonatal assessment, neonatal respiratory care, neonatal pathology, pediatric pathology, pediatric respiratory care, adolescent assessment, and adolescent respiratory care.
Review of respiratory therapy as it pertains to the national credential examinations administered by the NBRC. Emphasizes decision making and problem solving as they relate to clinical respiratory care. Topics include: medical ethics, basic computer literacy, CRTT exam preparation, and RRT exam preparation.
2
Continues development of proficiency levels in skills introduced in Clinical Practices I and II. In addition, intermittent positive pressure breathing, chest physiotherapy, and airway care are introduced. Case presentations are required to integrate clinical and classroom theory. Topics include: intermittent positive pressure breathing, chest physiotherapy, airway care, medical gas therapy, oxygen therapy, aerosol therapy, incentive spirometry, and patient assessment.
2
Continues development of proficiency levels in skills introduced in Clinical Practices I, II, and III. In addition, the student is introduced to critical respiratory care. Case presentations are required to integrate clinical and classroom theory. Topics include: intermittent positive pressure breathing, chest physiotherapy, airway care, medical gas therapy, oxygen therapy, aerosol therapy, incentive spirometry, patient assessment, and respiratory care of the critical care patient.
3
Continues development of skills required in the intensive care of the respiratory patient. Case presentations are required to integrate clinical and classroom theory. Topics include: basic respiratory care of critical care patients, airway management, ventilator monitoring, arterial blood collection, blood gas analysis, and EKG.
7
Provides students with an opportunity for in-depth application and reinforcement of adult intensive care. In addition, students are provided an opportunity for application and reinforcement of pediatric and neonatal intensive care, advanced diagnostics, and rehabilitation/home care. Topics include: mechanical ventilation initiation, patient stabilization, critical care monitoring, hemodynamic measurement, hemodynamic evaluation, bronchial hygiene, weaning mechanics, extubation, arterial line sampling, advanced diagnostics, pediatric/neonatal respiratory care, and rehabilitation/home care.
Provides an overview of the concepts, procedures, and equipment used in rehabilitation and in the delivery of long-term care to persons with chronic pulmonary disorders. Topics include: cardiopulmonary rehabilitation/home care concepts, cardiopulmonary rehabilitation/home care procedures, and cardiopulmonary rehabilitation/home care equipment.