At a Glance:

Advisor:
Walker: Pam Turner
Pam Turner, Program Director & Instructor of Social Work Assistance
Office: 6100a
Phone: 706-764-3863
Email:
Campus: Walker County Campus
Department: Public Service Technology, Social Work

Credentials

M.S.W., Florida International University; B.S.W., Florida International University; L.C.S.W.

 

VIDEO: Social Work Assistant Program

Social Work Assistant (SW23)

Offered at the Following Campus

  • Walker County Campus

Program Overview

The Social Work Assistant Program is designed to prepare individuals to obtain entry-level employment in public and private social service agencies. The social worker assistant is equipped with the skills, knowledge, values, and sensitivity to effectively serve human needs in a variety of community settings. Students have the option to select courses that will prepare them to provide client services, as well as support for families in a variety of fields, such as psychology, rehabilitation, and social work. They may assist clients in identifying social and community services that will best assist them. They may assist the social worker in developing, organizing, and conducting programs to resolve problems relevant to human relations, substance abuse, adult day care, and rehabilitation.

Course Overview

Credit Hours
General Core Curriculum (15 hours)
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
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Humanities/Fine Arts Elective
3
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Social/Behavior Sciences Elective
3
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General Education Elective
3
and one of the following (3 hours)
Emphasizes algebra, statistics, and mathematics of finance. Topics include fundamental operations of algebra, sets and logic, probability and statistics, geometry, mathematics of voting and districting, and mathematics of finance.
3
Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.
MATH
1111
3
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.
Occupational Curriculum (48 hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
This course provides an introduction to social welfare institution and the profession of social work. It focuses on the values, ethics, and methods of generalist social work practice with an emphasis on diversity. Students will be introduced to basic social welfare policies, community agencies, and at-risk populations.
A practical course in the how to of human service case management. Students will learn the step-by-step process of case management from the initial referral for services, determination of eligibility for services, writing a formal plan for services, case documentation techniques, and techniques for monitoring a clients progress through the service delivery system, to case closure/follow-up activities. This course will include how to access community resources, how to interpret and utilize information from other professionals, and the development of interviewing, intervention, case recording, and caseload management skills. Legal and ethical issues in service delivery will also be discussed.
This course provides an overview of multi-cultural and critical perspectives on understanding: individuals, families, and their interpersonal and group relationships; life span development; and theories of well-being, stress, coping, and adaptation. Students learn to address biopsychosocial influences on human functioning.
This course is offered as a beginning general foundation class and focuses on social work practice with individuals. It will emphasize the initial contact and rapport building skills utilized in partnering with clients in the social work process, interviewing skills and counseling techniques along with the assessment of a clients situation, and determination of the appropriate level of intervention for the change effort. Students will be expected to participate in interpersonal sharing and activities. Additional areas of study include: interviewing for assessment, the person in environment perspective, motivational interviewing, and ethical framework for practice.
This course examines various modalities for assessing and intervening with children and adolescents with special needs. The course focuses on problem assessment, topics of intervention strategies, techniques and methods for determining the effectiveness of interventions with children and adolescents.
This course will provide students with a foundational understanding of the knowledge and skills required to participate in and lead small groups in a variety of settings. The course emphasizes an experiential approach which will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills in planning, facilitating, organizing, and evaluating the success of groups in micro and macro practice. Students will learn about the basic issues in group work and how to design groups for and and work with children, youth, and adults. Emphasis will be placed on exploration and application of group work theory, principles and practices of group counseling, stages of group development, group dynamics, and group leadership. The latest research, ethical guidelines, and practices in group work will be examined and applied. Students will explore the interaction between groups and systems with their external environments and learn about concepts, theories, and methods and skills relevant to group work with diverse populations. Application of group work methods with at-risk populations will also be explored.
This course examines various modalities for assessing and interviewing with children and adolescents. It focuses on Bio-psychosocial changes, interpersonal relationships and the individuals ability to relate to the social environment. Topics include: child maltreatment, teen parenting, delinquency, violent behavior, school dropout, suicide, substance abuse, and runaway behavior.
This course explores the aging process and the experience of aging from a variety of perspectives. Physiological psychological and socio-culturally. Emphasis is placed on understanding the normative changes associated with the aging process, as well as the ways in which those changes are experienced personally and socially. Issues that will be reviewed include the realities of aging on our society; issues around health and emotional well being and aging, including life adjustments, physical health and mental problems and changes in physical appearance; and a look into the future of aging.
The field practicum is an educationally focused, guided field experience in which students engage in community-based practice with individuals, families, and/or communities. Students gain experience with various social work roles, such as advocate, broker, and counselor. Students learn to function as professional generalists social workers in an organizational setting, to demonstrate an understanding of and behavior consistent with the NASW Code of Ethics, and to increasingly assume professional responsibility. Special emphasis is placed on the identification of specific needs, the empowerment of diverse populations at the micro and mezzo levels, and a keen awareness of social justice issues. Students will be under the supervision of the Social Work program faculty and/or persons designated to coordinate work experience arrangements.
The field practicum is an educationally focused, guided field experience in which students engage in community-based practice with individuals, families, and/or communities. Students gain experience with various social work roles, such as advocate, broker, and counselor. Students learn to function as professional generalist social workers in an organizational setting, to demonstrate an understanding of and behavior consistent with the NASW Code of Ethics, and to increasingly assume professional responsibility. Special emphasis is placed on the identification of specific needs, the empowerment of diverse populations at the micro and mezzo levels, and a keen awareness of social justice issues. Students will be under the supervision of the Social Work program, faculty and/or persons designated to coordinate work experience arrangements.
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Guided Electives- See Advisor for List
9