At a Glance:

Advisor:
Gordon : Nathan Patterson

Nathan Patterson, Fire Science Instructor
Office: 339
Phone: 706-378-1731
Email:
Campus: Gordon County Campus
Department: Public Service Technology

 

VIDEO: Fire Science Technology

Fire Science Technology (FS13)

Offered at the Following Campus

  • Gordon County Campus

Program Overview

The Fire Science Associate of Applied Science degree program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare fire service personnel at all levels to become better officers and leaders. The program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to retrain and upgrade present knowledge and skills. Completion of the program of study leads to an AAS degree in Fire Science.

Course Overview

Credit Hours
General Core Curriculum (15 hours)
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
XXX
xxx
Humanities/Fine Arts Elective
3
XXX
xxx
Social/Behavior Sciences Elective
3
XXX
xxx
General Education Elective
3
and one of the following (3 hours)
Emphasizes algebra, statistics, and mathematics of finance. Topics include fundamental operations of algebra, sets and logic, probability and statistics, geometry, mathematics of voting and districting, and mathematics of finance.
3
Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.
MATH
1111
3
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.
Occupational Curriculum (47 hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
This course provides the necessary knowledge and skills for an emergency responder to become a successful fire officer. The student will learn how to become a responsible leader and supervisor to a crew of firefighters, how to manage a budget for the fire station, understand standard operating procedures, and be able to manage an incident. Also, an understanding of basic fire prevention methods, fire and building codes, and records systems will be covered throughout the course. Upon completion of this course the student emergency responder candidate/recruit will have the basic skills and knowledge to be able to qualify for a certificate of completion or seek certification through the appropriate governing agency for the following: 1. NFA Leadership I 2. NFA Leadership II 3. NFA Leadership III This course meets the requirements NFPA 1021 Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications and all other state, local, and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements.
This course presents the principles of applying fire department resources to mitigate a fire or related emergency. General topics include: principles of firefighting, size up, engine company operations, hose line selection and placement, water supply, standpipe and sprinkler operations, ladder company operations, forcible entry, ventilation and search and rescue. Specific-fires reviewed will include private dwellings, multiple dwellings, commercial buildings, high-rise structures, buildings under construction, structural collapse, flammable liquid and gas fires and waterfront fires.
Students will learn to analyze jobs and information, then prepare and present related training. Emphasis is placed on planning, organizing, presenting, and testing, using methodologies appropriate to the subject. Topics include: orientation to emergency services instruction, communication, planning and analysis, objectives, learning, assessment, methods of instruction, instructor materials, media, training related group dynamics, classroom management, the legal environment, and NPQ Fire Instructor I. Students will have numerous hands-on opportunities to apply what they learn. Successful completers of FRSC 1132 are qualified to test for the National Professional Qualification (NPQ) Fire Instructor I Exam.
This course provides emergency responder personnel with the information to respond safely, limit possible exposure to all personnel, and to provide information to the proper authorities as being a primary goal while reacting in the defensive mode of operation. The first responder operations level responsibilities are recognition and identification of a hazardous material scene, the gathering of information, the notification of the proper authorities, the isolation of the area by setting perimeters/zones, possible evacuation, protection by initiating the incident management system, emergency decontamination, and performing defensive actions only. Even though the first responder is a member of an emergency response service, they are not trained in specialized protective clothing or specialized control equipment. Thus, the first responder is not a member of a hazardous materials response team. This course meets the requirements of NFPA 472 - Professional Competence of First Responders to Haz Mat Incidents at the Operations Level. This course also meets the requirements of OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120, EPA, USDOT, and all other appropriate state, local and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements. Also required as prerequisite: NPQ FF I and NPQ Hazardous Materials Awareness Level
Emphasis is placed on the shared responsibility of all fire service personnel to prevent fires and fire losses by survey of fire prevention activities, conducting basic fire prevention inspections, practicing life safety codes, review of local and state laws regarding fire inspection, and review of applicable codes and standards. Topics include: code administration, inspection, use and occupancy, building limitations and types of construction, fire resistive construction elements, installation of fire protection systems, mean of egress, interior finish requirements, general fire safety provisions, maintenance of fire protection systems, means of egress maintenance for occupancies, hazardous materials, flammable liquids and aerosols, detonation and deflagration hazards, hazardous assembly occupancies, other storage and processing occupancies, compressed gases and cryogenic liquids, pesticides and other health hazards, and using referenced standards. Successful completion of FRSC 1151 qualifies individuals to test for the National Professional Qualification (NPQ) Inspector Level-I examination
This course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills for the emergency responder to understand occupational safety and health and be able to develop safety programs. The course starts with an introduction to occupational safety and health and covers the history, national agencies that produce injury and fatality reports, and efforts that have been made to address safety and health problems in emergency service occupations. The course will review safety related regulations and standards and discuss how to implement them through risk management processes. There will be lectures and discussions on pre-incident safety, safety at fire emergencies, safety at medical and rescue emergencies, safety at specialized incidents, and post-incident safety management. Personnel roles and responsibilities will be covered, so that knowledge can be gained on the relationship to the overall safety and health program by the different responding and administrative personnel at emergency scenes. Lectures and discussions on how to develop, manage, and evaluate safety programs will be covered to provide general knowledge and basic skills on occupational health and safety programs. Finally information management and various other special topics will be covered to gain knowledge on the legal, ethical, and financial considerations that programs need to be aware of and how to collect the data and report it.
3
This course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills for the emergency responder to become a diverse leader and manager in their department. The course starts with the history of the fire service which focuses on the historical events that have forged the fire service today. Discussions on preparing for the future are designed to provide information to develop a game plan for personal success. Leadership and Management principles will be taught to blend the academics of leadership and management research into what occurs in the fire service organization on a daily basis. Leadership styles will be discussed to help understand how to lead and manage and, as important, why its done. The course will take an insightful look into how people handle change personally and organizationally. Discussions on ethics will be focused on the elements critical to ethical leadership and management practices. The course will explore the elements of team building and provide a depth of understanding how to blend various styles and personalities to get the most from people. Discussions on managing emergency services will target budgeting and personnel management the support elements that are so vital to every organization. Quality of the fire service will also be looked at for methods of quality improvement and their applications to improve the services delivered to citizens everyday. An in-depth overview of the changes in disaster planning and response since 9-11, and includes ways to help with community evaluation and preparedness processes. Finally, shaping the future will explore the possibilities of what may occur in the fire service and how you can play an important role in helping to shape the fire service of the future.
This course begins with the history and theories of the use of water for fire extinguishment then moves to practical application of the principles of hydraulics in water systems and on the fire ground. Topics include: water at rest and in motion, velocity and discharge, water distribution systems, fire service pumps, friction loss, engine and nozzle pressures, fire streams, standpipe systems, automatic sprinkler systems, firefighting foams, and the clip board friction loss system.
A review of fire detection and protection systems including: automatic sprinkler systems, portable fire extinguishers, restaurant/kitchen systems, special hazard systems, detection systems, and control systems. The applicable laws, codes and standards will be introduced along with regulatory and support agencies. Specific topics include: introduction to fire protection systems, water supply systems for fire protection systems, water-based suppression systems, nonwater-based suppression systems, fire alarm systems, smoke management systems, and portable fire extinguishers.
Presents building construction features from the perspective of the fire service with emphasis placed on the use of building construction information to prevent and reduce fire fighter and civilian deaths and injuries. Topics include: principles of building construction, building construction classification, building construction hazards and tactical considerations, structural loads and stresses, structural building components and functions, fire resistance and flame spread, building codes, structural failure and firefighter safety, and firefighter safety in structural and wildland firefighting.
FRSC
2141
4
The Incident Command course is designed to illustrate the responsibilities to use, deploy, implement, and/or function within an Incident Command System (ICS) as well as functioning within multi-jurisdictions incident under the Incident Management System (IMS). The course emphasizes the need for incident management systems, an overview of the structure and expandable nature of ICS, an understanding of the command skills needed by departmental officers to use ICS guidelines effectively, and scenario practice on how to apply ICS and IMS. The National Incident Management System (NIMS) will illustrate and provide the consistent nationwide template to enable all government, private-sectors, and non-governmental organizations to work together during virtual all domestic incidents. These course competencies will cover those objectives entailed in NIMS 100, 200, 700, and 800.
Presents an introduction to Fire Investigation. Emphasis is placed upon: fire behavior, combustion properties of various materials, sources of ignition, and investigative techniques for - structures, grassland, wildland, automobiles, vehicles, ships and other types of fire investigation, causes of electrical fires, chemical fires, explosive evaluations, laboratory operation, Techniquest used in fire deaths and injuries, arson as a crime, other techniques, State and Federal laws, and future trends in fire investigative technology.