At a Glance:

Advisors:
Gordon: Beatriz Stitzer
Beatriz Stitzer, Assistant Dean of Public Service Technologies
Office: 307
Phone: 706-378-1720
Email:
Campus: Gordon County Campus
Department: Early Childhood, Public Service Technology

Credentials

M.Ed., Berry College; B.S., Southern Adventist University, Collegedale, TN


Polk: Karon Futch
Karon Futch, Instructor of Early Childhood Education
Office: A113
Phone: 706-378-1792
Email:
Campus: Polk County Campus
Department: Early Childhood, Public Service Technology

Credentials

M.S., Walden University; B.S., University of West Georgia


Floyd, Walker, and Whitfield Murray: Susan Kendrick
Susan Kendrick, Director of Early Childhood Care and Education
Office: 6108b
Phone: 706-764-3848
Email:
Campus: Walker County Campus
Department: Early Childhood, Public Service Technology

Credentials

Ed.S., Lincoln Memorial University; M.E., Berry College; B.S., Jacksonville State University

Early Childhood Care and Education (ECC2)

Offered at the Following Campuses

  • Walker County Campus
  • Polk County Campus
  • Gordon County Campus
  • Whitfield Murray Campus

Program Overview

The Early Childhood Care and Education Diploma program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare students for a variety of careers in the field of early childhood education. The program emphasizes a combination of early childhood care and education theory and practical application as well as limited general core competencies necessary for successful employment. Graduates have qualifications to be employed in early care and education settings including child care centers, Head Start, and Georgia Pre-K programs.

Gainful Employment Information

Entrance Requirements

Prior to enrolling in a lab course (ECCE 1121, ECCE 2240), students must provide the following documentation:  (1) A satisfactory criminal record check; (2) CPR/First Aid certification.

Course Overview

Credit Hours
General Core Curriculum (8 - 9 hours)
Emphasizes the development and improvement of written and oral communication abilities. Topics include analysis of writing, applied grammar and writing skills, editing and proofreading skills, research skills, and oral communication skills.
Emphasizes the application of basic mathematical skills used in the solution of occupational and technical problems. Topics include fractions, decimals, percents, ratios and proportions, measurement and conversion, formula manipulation, technical applications, and basic statistics.
and one of the following (2 - 3 hours)
Emphasizes human relations and professional development in today*s rapidly changing world that prepares students for living and working in a complex society. Topics include human relations skills, job acquisition skills and communication, job retention skills, job advancement skills, and professional image skills.
PSYC
1010
3
Presents basic concepts within the field of psychology and their application to everyday human behavior, thinking, and emotion. Emphasis is placed on students understanding basic psychological principles and their application within the context of family, work and social interactions. Topics include an overview of psychology as a science, the nervous and sensory systems, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychological disorders and their treatment, stress and health, and social relations.
Occupational Curriculum (45 hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
3
Introduces concepts relating the responsibilities and procedures involved in a variety of early childhood care situations. Topics include historical perspectives; professionalism; guidance; developmentally appropriate practices; learning environment (including all children); cultural diversity; and licensing, accreditation, and credentialing.
Introduces the student to the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of the young child (prenatal through 12 years of age). The course provides for competency development in observing, recording, and interpreting growth and development stages in the young child; advancing physical and intellectual competence; supporting social and emotional development; and examining relationships between child development and positive guidance. Topics include developmental characteristics, prenatal through age 12, developmental guidance applications, observing and recording techniques, ages and stages of development, and introduction to children with special needs.
Introduces the theory, practices, and requirements for establishing and maintaining a safe, healthy learning environment. Topics include CPR and first aid, health issues, safety issues, child abuse and neglect, and nutritional needs of children.
Provides student with an understanding of developmentally effective approaches to teaching, learning, observing, documenting and assessment strategies that promote positive development for young children. The course will enable the student to establish a learning environment appropriate for young children and to identify the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment in the development of curriculum for young children. Topics include observing, documenting, and assessing; learning environments; development of curriculum plans and materials; curriculum approaches; and instructional media.
Introduces the concepts related to creativity in art,music, movement and creative drama, and facilitating children*s creative expression across the curriculum. Topics include concepts of creativity and expression; theories of young children*s creative development; facilitation of children*s creative expression, media, methods and materials across the curriculum; appreciation of children*s art processes and products; appreciation of children*s creativity in music, movement and dance; appreciation of children*s creative expression in play and creative drama; and art and music appreciation.
Provides the student with the opportunity to gain a supervised experience in a practicum placement site allowing demonstration of techniques obtained from course work. Practicum topics include promoting child development and learning; building family and community relationships; observing, documenting, and assessing to support young children and families; teaching and learning; becoming a professional; and guidance techniques and classroom management.
3
Develops knowledge, skills, and abilities in supporting young children*s literacy acquisition and development, birth through age twelve. Topics include developmental continuum of reading and writing, literacy acquisition birth to five years of age, literacy acquisition in kindergarten, literacy acquisition in early grades, and literacy acquisition in children who are culturally and linguistically diverse.
ECCE
2116
3
Presents the process of introducing math and science concepts to young children. Includes planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate activities and development of math and science materials, media and methods. Topics include inquiry approach to learning; cognitive stages and developmental processes in developing math and science concepts with children birth to five; cognitive stages and developmental processes in developing math and science concepts with children in kindergarten and primary grades; planning math and science activities; and development of math and science materials, media and methods.
Enables the student to value the complex characteristics of children*s families and communities and to develop culturally responsive practices which will support family partnerships. Students use their understanding to build reciprocal relationships which promote children*s development and learning. Students are introduced to local programs and agencies that offer services to children and families within the community. Topics include professional responsibilities, family/social issues, community resources, family education and support, teacher-family communication, community partnerships, social diversity and anti-bias concerns, successful transitions, and school-family activities.
Examines effective guidance practices in group settings based upon the application of threoretical models of child development and of developmentally appropriate practices. Focus will be given to individual, family, and cultural diversity. Topics will include developmentally appropriate child guidance (birth through 12); effective classroom management, including preventive and interventive techniques; understanding challenging behaviors; and implementing guidance plans.
12
Provides the student with the opportunity to gain a supervised experience in an actual or simulated work site allowing demonstration of techniques obtained from course work. Practicum topics include promoting child development and learning; building family and community relationships; observing, documenting, and assessing to support young children and families; teaching and learning; becoming a professional; and guidance techniques and classroom management.