At a Glance:

Advisors:
Gordon: Tyler Gayan
Tyler Gayan, Instructor of Criminal Justice
Office: 334
Phone: 706-378-1706
Email:
Campus: Gordon County Campus
Department: Basic Law Enforcement, Public Service Technology, Criminal Justice

Credentials

M.S., Georgia State University; B.S., University of North Carolina at Charlotte


Walker: Tony Adams
Tony Adams, Assistant Dean of Public Service Technologies; Program Director & Instructor of Criminal Justice
Office: 5100
Phone: 706-764-3815
Email:
Campus: Walker County Campus
Department: Public Service Technology, Criminal Justice

Credentials

M.P.A., Jacksonville State University; B.S., Jacksonville State University


Whitfield Murray:  Tony Adams
Tony Adams, Assistant Dean of Public Service Technologies; Program Director & Instructor of Criminal Justice
Office: 5100
Phone: 706-764-3815
Email:
Campus: Walker County Campus
Department: Public Service Technology, Criminal Justice

Credentials

M.P.A., Jacksonville State University; B.S., Jacksonville State University

Criminal Justice Technology (CJT2)

Offered at the Following Campuses

  • Whitfield Murray Campus
  • Walker County Campus
  • Gordon County Campus

Program Overview

The Criminal Justice Technology diploma program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for Criminal Justice professions. Learning opportunities develop academic, occupational, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of Criminal Justice theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a Criminal Justice Technology diploma. Graduates who are current practitioners will benefit through enhancement of career potential. Entry-level persons will be prepared to pursue diverse opportunities in the corrections, security, investigative, and police administration fields. Completion of the Criminal Justice Technology diploma does not ensure certification of officer status in Georgia. Students must seek such certification from the Peace Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) Council.

Gainful Employment Information

Course Overview

Credit Hours
General Core Curriculum (9 hours)
Emphasizes the development and improvement of written and oral communication abilities. Topics include analysis of writing, applied grammar and writing skills, editing and proofreading skills, research skills, and oral communication skills.
Emphasizes the application of basic mathematical skills used in the solution of occupational and technical problems. Topics include fractions, decimals, percents, ratios and proportions, measurement and conversion, formula manipulation, technical applications, and basic statistics.
PSYC
1010
3
Presents basic concepts within the field of psychology and their application to everyday human behavior, thinking, and emotion. Emphasis is placed on students understanding basic psychological principles and their application within the context of family, work and social interactions. Topics include an overview of psychology as a science, the nervous and sensory systems, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychological disorders and their treatment, stress and health, and social relations.
Occupational Curriculum (39 hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
Introduces the development and organization of the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics include: the American criminal justice system; constitutional limitations; organization of enforcement, adjudication, and corrections; and career opportunities and requirements.
CRJU
1030
3
Provides an analysis of all phases of the American correctional system and practices, including its history, procedures, and objectives. Topics include: history and evolution of correctional facilities; legal and administrative problems; institutional facilities and procedures; probation, parole, and prerelease programs; alternative sentencing; rehabilitation; community involvement; and staffing.
This course examines the principles of the organization, administration, and duties of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. Topics include: history and philosophy of law enforcement, evaluation of administrative practices, problems in American law enforcement agencies, emerging concepts, professionalism, and community crime prevention programs.
This course introduces criminal law in the United States, but emphasizes the current specific status of Georgia criminal law. The course will focus on the most current statutory contents of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (O.C.G.A.) with primary emphasis on the criminal and traffic codes. Topics include: historic development of criminal law in the United States; statutory law, Georgia Code (O.C.G.A.) Title 16 - Crimes and Offenses; statutory law, Georgia Code (O.C.G.A.) Title 40 - Motor Vehicle and Traffic Offenses; and Supreme Court rulings that apply to criminal law.
This course provides an exploration ethics and cultural perspectives in criminal justice. In presenting ethics, both the individual perspective and the organizational standpoint will be examined. Four areas of ethical decision making opportunities are studied including: law enforcement ethics; correctional ethics; legal profession ethics; and policymaking ethics. The presentation of cultural perspectives is designed to aid law enforcement officers to better understand and communicate with members of other cultures with whom they come in contact in the line of duty. Topics include: defining and applying terms related to intercultural attitudes, role-play activities related to intercultural understanding, developing interpersonal/intercultural communication competence, and development of personal intercultural growth plan.
This course emphasizes those provisions of the Bill of Rights which pertain to criminal justice. Topics include: characteristics and powers of the three branches of government; principles governing the operation of the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment.
CRJU
2050
3
Introduces the substantive law of major crimes against persons and property. Attention is given to observation of courtroom trials. Topics include: laws of arrest and search and seizure; procedures governing arrest, trial, and administration of criminal sanctions; rules of evidence; general court procedures; rights and duties of officers and citizens; and Supreme Court rulings that apply to Law Enforcement/Overview of Constitutional Law.
CRJU
2070
3
Analyzes the nature, extent, and causes of juvenile delinquency, and examines processes in the field of juvenile justice. Topics include: survey of juvenile law, comparative analysis of adult and juvenile justice systems, and prevention and treatment of juvenile delinquency.
XXX
xxx
Occ Guided Elect (See advisor)
9
and one of the following (3 hours)
Provides experiences necessary for further professional development and exposure to related agencies in the criminal justice field. The student will pursue an externship in a related agency supervised by the instructor.