At a Glance:

Advisor:
Gordon: Gerald McFry

Gerald McFry, Program Director & Instructor of Business Management
Office: B639
Phone: 706-272-2952
Email:
Campus: Whitfield Murray Campus
Department: Business Management, Business Administrative Technologies

Credentials

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology

Technical Management Specialist (TMS1)

Offered at the Following Campus

  • Gordon County Campus

Program Overview

The Technical Management Specialist Certificate is designed to build upon a student’s previously achieved TCC, Diploma or Associate Degree and add the management component to their education. Learning opportunities will introduce, develop and reinforce students’ knowledge, skills and attitudes required to work in the student’s current area of expertise. Graduates will receive a Technical Management Specialist TCC.

Course Overview

Credit Hours
Required Courses (24 hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
Develops skills and behaviors necessary for successful supervision of people and their job responsibilities. Emphasis will be placed on real life concepts, personal skill development, applied knowledge and managing human resources. Course content is intended to help managers and supervisors deal with a dramatically changing workplace being affected by technology changes, a more competitive and global market place, corporate restructuring and the changing nature of work and the workforce. Topics include: Understanding the Managers Job and Work Environment; Building an Effective Organizational Culture; Leading, Directing, and the Application of Authority; Planning, Decision-Making, and Problem-Solving; Human Resource Management, Administrative Management, Organizing, and Controlling.
This course is designed as an overview of the Human Resource Management (HRM) function and of the manager and supervisors role in managing the career cycle from organizational entry to exit. It acquaints the student with the authority, responsibility, functions, and problems of the human resource manager, with an emphasis on developing familiarity with the real world applications required of employers and managers who increasingly are in partnership with HRM generalists and specialists in their organizations. Topics include: strategic human resource management, contemporary issues in HRM: ethics, diversity and globalization; the human resource/supervisor partnership; human resource planning and productivity; job description analysis, development, and design: recruiting, interviewing, and selecting employees; performance management and appraisal systems; employee training and development: disciplinary action and employee rights; employee compensation and benefits; labor relations and employment law; and technology applications in HRM.
XXX
xxx
Specific Occupational-Guided Electives(advisor approved)
12
and one of the following (3 hours)
MGMT
1110
3
Develops a working knowledge of the laws of employment necessary for managers. Topics include: Employment Law, the Courts, Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), Discrimination Law, Selecting Applicants Under the Law, OSHA and Safety, Affirmative Action, At-Will Doctrine, Right to Privacy, Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Workers Compensation, Unemployment Compensation, and National Labor Relations Act.
Provides a student with an overview of the relationship of rank and file employees to management in business organizations. The nature of the workplace, the economic foundations of work organizations, and the history of the relationship between management and labor is examined. The course acquaints the student with the principles of developing positive relationships between management and labor within the context of the legal environment governing labor relations. Topics include: the nature of the American workplace; the economic history of business organizations, the historical roots of labor-management relations; adversarial and cooperative approaches to labor relations; the legal framework of labor relations; employee-employer rights; collective bargaining and union organizing processes; union and nonunion grievance procedures; international labor relations; and the future of labor-management relations in a changing economy. Case studies, readings, and role-plays are used to simulate workplace applications in labor relations.
This course introduces the study of contracts and other legal issues and obligations for businesses. Topics include: creation and evolution of laws, court decision processes, legal business structures, sales contracts, commercial papers, Uniform Commercial Code, and risk-bearing devices.